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Posted 5/29/2008 9:06am by Eleanor Kane.

Today we offer fresh cut lettuce from our fields along with potted heirloom tomato plants, perennial and annual flowers, and handmade herbal soaps. We also have a small assortment of potted firs and blue spruce trees. Hours are 10am - 6pm.

We expect to have asparagus on Sunday, and probably not have anymore of it this year.  We put in a new bed last year and could only harvest from it for a short time. Next year we expect to double our production.

The strawberries are looking great. The Early Glow  and Cabot have been setting berries, the Jewel are loaded with flowers at this point, as they mature after the Early Glow variety. We have other varieties as well. Sometime around June 10th we may begin picking berries for the stand only. We will send out an email to everyone  on our email list a few days prior to the first day we open.  Several days later we expect to have enough berries to begin the "pick your own" season.  Call the farm phone anytime for updates as well. 868-2001

Posted 5/28/2008 9:57am by Eleanor Kane.

Today we offer fresh cut asparagus and lettuce from our fields along with potted heirloom tomato plants, perennial and annual flowers, and handmade herbal soaps. We also have a small assortment of potted firs and blue spruce trees. Hours are 10am - 6pm.

The strawberries are looking great. The Early Glow  and Cabot have been setting berries, the Jewel are loaded with flowers at this point as they mature after the Early Glow variety. We have other varieties as well. Sometime around June 10th we may begin picking berries. We will send out an email to everyone  on our email list a few days prior to the first day we open for "pick your own". Call the farm phone anytime for updates as well. 868-2001

Posted 5/25/2008 9:22am by Eleanor Kane.
Today we offer fresh cut asparagus and lettuce from our fields along with perennials, annuals, and handmade herbal soaps.  We will be open tomorrow, if there is enough asparagus to pick in the morning. Weekend Hours are 10am -4 pm.
Posted 5/22/2008 9:05am by Eleanor Kane.

Today we offer fresh cut asparagus, spinach and lettuce from our fields along with perennials, annuals, and handmade herbal soaps.  We will be open tomorrow if there is enough asparagus to pick in the morning. We will be closed Sat 5/24 ( I am graduating from UNH), and open on Sunday 5/26 10am -4 pm.

Posted 5/21/2008 10:15am by Eleanor Kane.

Today we offer fresh cut asparagus, spinach and lettuce from our fields along with perennials, annuals, and handmade herbal soaps.

Posted 5/17/2008 8:49am by Eleanor Kane.

Today we offer fresh cut asparagus and spinach from our fields, perennials, annuals, and handmade herbal soaps.

Posted 5/8/2008 8:38am by Eleanor Kane.
We will be open 10am - 4pm on Sat May 10th with fresh cut Spinach, potted tomato plants, potted annual flowers and perennials and Hand made soaps. The asparagus is growing slowly and we are unsure as of today 5/08, if we will have enough to sell this Saturday.  
Posted 5/1/2008 7:22am by Eleanor Kane.

It's May 1st and Randy has been up most of the night checking on the frost protection system we use on the stawberries. The alarm went off at 8pm last night and alerted us that the temperature was down to 35 degrees.The forcast was for a heavy frost.  It was time to turn on the irrigation pump and spray the strawberries plants with a fine mist of water. The water will form ice on the plant and drive heat inward and protect the buds from damage. Water must be applied until the temperature increases enough to melt it off the plants or damage will occur. Soon the buds will expand into a pretty white petaled flower with a yellow center. This yellow center, when damaged from frost, will appear black in color and no berry will form.  Frost protected plants will form flowers, bees will pollinate them, petals will drop and the yellow center will expand into an achene, commonly known as a strawberry fruit. yum yum!

Asparagus is beginning to poke up thru the soil. We will be offering it soon.

Posted 1/9/2008 11:17am by Eleanor Kane.

Feb, 10 2008,  School break is over. Homework is my life for this last semester at UNH. I am so very grateful for the opportunity to go to college. Do you realize that less than 2% of the world's population goes to college?  Many people are busy hoping and trying to survive from day to day, never mind think about an education. I am so fortunate to live in this country! I can practice any religion I choose, get a great education, go about my day without much concern for my safety,eat when I want and explore a myriad of opportunities on any given day.    

After I graduate this spring, my plan is to be of service in what ever way God sees fit. It may be to farm here fulltime or work elsewhere. I don't know.  Perhaps a position with Cooperative Extension. I am passionate about educating the public concerning the importance of maintaining an agricultural base here in NH and elsewhere in this country.  This includes the subject of Food Security. So much of our food is grown in other countries now. It doesn't make good sense as most wars begin over a lack of food. Not to pick on China but, more that one third of the organic food on USA  store shelves is grown there. The inputs to ship the food from China to here is tremendous. This is not a sustainable practice at all. If they can compete against farmers in this county in the organic food arena, can you imagine the small pittance of pay the farm workers recieve.  I don't believe this is a Fair Trade adventure at all. As relevant, the organic certification inspectors have been blocked from inspecting the farming practices in China. When you purchase organic please check and make sure it is not grown from far away.  I can understand once in a while purchasing something especially yummy for a special occasion even if it is from California or Florida, but China is too far.  I welcome comments. I must get to my homework now and hope to get out for a cross country ski before dark.

 

January 2008    Now that the holidays are past we are looking over last years records and deciding on crops for the 2008 season. I recieve numerous plant catalogs in the mail and spend time going thru them. You can learn a lot from a catalog and also reading the plant names helps keep them fresh in my mind. 

  Randy has been pruning Christmas trees and cutting lots of firewood.

Although we are not selling lettuce or spinach at this time we still have it growing in the hoophouse. It is not heated, however the crops have row cover over them inside the hoop. We are experimenting. I picked 2 heads yesterday and pinched a few handfuls of spinach leaves for salad. It is really good. I'll write more on another day. Please ask questions or send comments.

 

Posted 12/24/2007 2:30pm by Eleanor Kane.

THIS WAS OUR 51ST YEAR OF CUT YOUR OWN CHRISTMAS TREES and we wish to thank each and every person that visited our farm over the Christmas Tree Season and all Summer and Fall. We would not be a farm without your support. Randy likes to say he's never had an ear of corn walk up and pay him. We may grow amazing sweet corn, however our most important asset is you, not our product. Thankyou, thankyou, thankyou for stopping in and spending a portion of your hard earned dollars here.

This year we had more trees available for cutting than last year and next year we will see an increase as well. Randy's beautiful Christmas wreaths sold out. I am open by appt for soap. Our handmade herbal soaps are sold at the farm stand year round. Jan thru May please call the business phone to make an appt to purchase soap. Our soap provide a luxurious lather and are made without any animal products or synthetic fragrances. We have over 20 varieties of Handmade Soaps along with various Kosher glycerin soaps and Rose and Lavender Dead Sea Bath Salts. Call the farm phone @ 868-2001 anytime with inquiries.

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