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Posted 8/25/2009 10:17pm by Eleanor Kane.

August farmstand hours: We are open 6 days per week, closed on Mondays and open on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 9-6, Saturday and Sunday 9-4pm.

On the farmstand we have peaches and strawberries, sweet corn, tomatoes, 5 varieties of hand dug potatoes (reds, yellows and whites), Blue potatoes, fingerling potatoes(Red French fingerlings), a green lettuce, swiss chard, onions, slicing and pickling cukes, summer squash, zucchini.

fresh picked strawberries on the farmstand and this sunny hot weather has sweetened them up.They cost $3/pint.

WE HAVE PEACHES STACKED IN CRATES EVERYWHERE! Randy has been picking our peaches every day now. We haven't sprayed the peaches in years and sell them in quart boxes for $3.50 each. They weigh about 2 lbs per box. We will only have them for several more days and then have a gap of a couple off weeks before the next variety is ready.

The green beans are very quick picking. I have 1 long row and two more rows that will be ready in early September.

We are still planning on the Pick Your Own tomatoes beginning approx September 1st,  Red or green for $1/pound.   We planted a mid summer patch and it is without blight!

The first planting of basil never amounted to much, however the 2nd planting is slowly growing  and about 1' tall, but not ready for cutting yet. I have more basil up in trays and think I will put it up in 3" pots for kitchen herbs.  Cilantro that went to seed is called Cumin! thank you to the anonymous caller for this information.

Later in September we will have more beets and carrots.

I've been cutting flowers from the cutting garden and making bouquets.

Only 18 more days until the Natural Heritage Agricultural Fair! Yikes, we have been planning this for over a year and it is almost time.

Posted 8/23/2009 7:51am by Eleanor Kane.

August farmstand hours: We are open 6 days per week, closed on Mondays and open on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 9-6, Saturday and Sunday 9-4pm.

On the farmstand we have peaches and strawberries, sweet corn, tomatoes, 5 varieties of hand dug potatoes (reds, yellows and whites), Blue potatoes, fingerling potatoes(Red French fingerlings), a beautiful red crinkly reddish green lettuce, swiss chard, onions,  lots of pickling cukes,  summer squash, zucchini.

We have lots of fresh picked strawberries on the farmstand and this sunny hot weather has sweetened them up.They cost $3/pint. These day neutrals berries get larger too. 

WE HAVE PEACHES STACKED IN CRATES EVERYWHERE! Randy has been picking our peaches every day now. We haven't sprayed the peaches in years and sell them in quart boxes for $3.50 each. They weigh about 2 lbs per box. We will only have them for another week maybe and then have a gap of a couple ofl weeks before the next variety is ready.

The green beans are very quick picking. I have 1 long row and two more rows that will be ready in early September.

We are still planning on the Pick Your Own tomatoes beginning approx September 1st,  Red or green for $1/pound.   We planted a mid summer patch and it is without blight!

 

Later in September we will have more beets and carrots.

 I've been cutting flowers from the cutting garden and making bouquets.

The first planting of basil never amounted to much, however the 2nd planting is slowly growing  and about 1' tall, but not ready for cutting yet. I have more basil up in trays and think I will put it up in 3" pots for kitchen herbs.  Cilantro that went to seed is not called cardoman but???????

 

 

Posted 8/20/2009 7:43pm by Eleanor Kane.

Why are all your tomatoes so small?  Are these the only tomatoes you have? This year we have heard lots of questions such at these.  Randy and I explain to these folks as they search thru the several flats of red gold, that the cold weather in June and yes the excessive rains, set back the tomato crop and stunted many of the 800 plants in our early  field of tomatoes. Then we point out the window to our late planting of tomatoes that we planted in mid July for our customers to pick in and say “they’ll be ready around the first of September” which by the way is about 3 to 4 weeks behind schedule.

 After supper tonight we were discussing why most people do not seem to connect the correlation between weather and crops anymore. We know it is not their fault and we know it all has to do with the movement away from homesteading and the move to the industrialization of agriculture. However what we don’t know is how to bring about the change that people will find physically and mentally possible in their all ready busy lives.                 

Prior to marrying a farmer I never gave a thought to weather conditions and crop availability.  I was clueless and helping out on the farmstand years ago for the first time I fell into a crash course on farming reality.  So this discussion brought me to the obvious question:  “How do we bring agriculture back to the forefront of everyone’s thinking?”

The New Hampshire seacoast area has great champions in this battle for our health, our farms and fields and forests. Two of them are Seacoast Eat Local and Slowfood Seacoast and they are a farmer’s best friend and performing great deeds.  However we need more help and I was thinking that our newspapers could perhaps have an agricultural paragraph each day. Our newscasters could have an agricultural short segment each day about weather, crop health, insect pressure, preventative measures and such. We have Margaret with Cooperative Extension on channel 9 afternoon news and this is helpful but does not address the broader aspect of agriculture on a daily basis.  Perhaps she could do more along these lines. 

We need to reignite the flame within all our brains, thru a sort of agricultural brainwashing and the only way this is going to happen is by hearing about farming over and over again until it once again becomes an essential alive humming within your brain.  OK, now I am getting tired, but you get the point. What do you think?

I must also mention the so called "low interest loans" for farming catastrophes that are available. I just think that most farmers are already living beyond their means and a loan will not help much. This brings me to the dairy farmers in our state and probably thru-out the Northeast. Have you heard that they lose money with each gallon of milk they produce?  I do not know much about the dairy business and all the problems, however I do know that losing the dairy industry in New England would be devastating for the landscape, tourism and us.

Posted 8/18/2009 9:59am by Eleanor Kane.

The sweet corn sat still during June and early July due to all the cold weather and now it is maturing all at the same time with some August heat. The June temperature was 10 degrees below average. I'm trying to make a statement here about all the fresh bounty we have at our farmstand.

We have sweet corn, tomatoes, 6 varieties of hand dug potatoes (reds, yellows and whites), Blue potatoes, fingerling potatoes(Russian Bananas and Red French fingerlings), a green butterhead lettuce and a beautiful red crinkly reddish green lettuce, swiss chard, onions,  lots of pickling cukes,  summer squash and lots of zucchini. Spinach is picked down and will be a few weeks before the next planting is ready. I am still learning how to time it so I have a constant supply.

We have lots of fresh picked strawberries on the farmstand and this sunny hot weather has sweetened them up.They cost $3/pint. These day neutrals berries get larger too. 

WE HAVE PEACHES STACKED IN CRATES EVERYWHERE! Randy has been picking our peaches every day now. We haven't sprayed the peaches in years and sell them in quart boxes for $3.50 each. They weigh about 2 lbs per box. We will only have them for 10 days or so and then have a gap of several weeks before the next variety is ready.

August farmstand hours: We are open 6 days per week, closed on Mondays and open on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 9-6, Saturday and Sunday 9-4pm.

The green beans are loaded and very quick picking. People asked me to plant them this year and I did, however they are not getting picked and the first two rows went by. Now I have 1 long row that is loaded and two more rows that will be ready in early September.

We are still planning on the Pick Your Own tomatoes beginning approx September 1st,  Red or green for $1/pound.   We planted a mid summer patch and it is without blight!

Later in September we will have more beets and carrots.

 

I've been cutting flowers from the cutting garden and making bouquets.

The first planting of basil never amounted to much, however the 2nd planting is slowly growing  and about 1' tall, but not ready for cutting yet. I have more basil up in trays and think I will put it up in 3" pots for kitchen herbs.  The cilantro is going to seed which will yield cardoman. Is this the correct spelling? Does anybody use cardoman?

 

Posted 8/9/2009 3:39pm by Eleanor Kane.

Usually we don't find local NH strawberries and sweet corn at the same time, however we have both! The sweet corn sat still during June and early July due to all the cold weather and now it is maturing all at the same time with some August heat. The June temperature was 10 degrees below average. I'm trying to make a statement here about all the fresh bounty we have at our farmstand.

Customer volume has been low at our farm and at the farmers markets and we are unsure why. We really hoped the eat local education would help increase volume. Is it because of the poor growing weather in June and early July and folks don't think we have much to sell?  Please let us know what you think about the low volume. Wallmart has captured 8% of American's income,(8% is huge),  and I don't really think their "not local" food is that cheap. Has the economy stopped people from shopping at farms and farmers markets?  What do you think?

August farmstand hours ; We are open 6 days per week, closed on Mondays and open on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 9-6, Saturday and Sunday 9-4pm.   We still have fair to good picking on the mid season raspberries.

The green beans are loaded and very quick picking.  I planted more 2 weeks ago for September picking. The late planting of tomatoes is growing great with this warm sunny weather. We expect to begin Pick Your Own tomatoes, red or green, around Sept 1st for $1/lb.

We have lots of fresh picked strawberries on the farmstand and this sunny hot weather has sweetened them up. These day neurtrals get larger too. 

WE HAVE PEACHES STACKED IN CRATES EVERYWHERE! Randy has been picking our peaches every day now. We haven't sprayed the peaches in years and sell them in quart boxes for $3.50 each. They weigh about 2 lbs.  We also have sweet corn, hand dug potatoes (reds and yellows), fingerling potatoes(Russian Bananas and French fingerlings), a green butterhead lettuce and a beautiful red crinkly reddish green lettuce, swiss chard, onions,  lots of slicing and pickling cukes,  tomatoes, summer squash and lots of zucchini. Spinach is picked down and will be a few weeks before the next planting is ready. I am still learning how to time it so I have a constant supply.

I've been cutting flowers from the cutting garden and making bouquets.

The first planting of basil never amounted to much, however the 2nd planting is slowly growing  and about 1' tall, but not ready for cutting yet.  The cilantro is going to seed which will yield cardoman. Is this the correct spelling? Does anybody use cardoman?

We are still planning on the Pick Your Own tomatoes beginning approx September 1st,  Red or green tomatoes.  We planted a mid summer patch and it is without blight!

 

Posted 8/5/2009 11:15am by Eleanor Kane.

MID-SUMMER WARREN FARM UPDATE

 

Here at the Warren Farm we thought an update would be in order, as the cool June and July have definitely changed the schedule of our crops.  We want to thank those who made the Fresh Picked June Strawberry and Pick Your Own Raspberry seasons a success.

Fresh Picked Strawberry Summer Season: We are excited that our expansion of this crop has begun to pay off and we now are keeping the farmstand stocked daily with fresh picked strawberries. Last year we picked these day neutral types to October 23rd.   We have pints priced at $3.00 each.

Fresh Picked Sweet Corn: The April and May weather were ideal in getting this crop established but the June and  July weather slowed the crop by approx. three weeks.  We will begin our season on Thursday or Friday of this week. Our price is the same as last year at $6.00 per dozen, $3.00 per ½ dozen and .50 per ear.

Fresh Picked and Pick Your Own Tomatoes: This heat loving crop had the hardest time in June and July. Our first field of 800 plants was stunted and only now is beginning to produce ripe tomatoes but only at a fraction of normal. We will use these to stock the farm stand. We saw what was happening and began starting plants in June for a second field. This second field is growing normally and will provide us the ability to have pick your own tomatoes starting approx. September 1. This second field will have 4th of July, Lemon Boy, Better Boy, Mortgage Lifter, Celebrity, Early Girl, and Sugar Snack Cherry Varieties.  This field does not have plum tomatoes.  The price for PYO tomatoes is $1/lb red or green.

Pick Your Own String Beans: This crop is doing great and is available for $2.00 per pound.  We have PYO flowers and herbs.

We stock the farmstand daily with fresh picked vegetables. Call or see the website for current crops.

We keep up to date information on our website www.warrenfarmnh.com.   Or call our farm phone at 603-868-2001 anytime. Our current hours are Tues thru Friday 9 to 6,  Saturday and Sunday 9 to 4 (except this Saturday Aug 8 we will close at 12:30 pm for a fellow farmer’s wedding) , Closed on Mondays.

We also want to remind everyone of the Natural Heritage Agricultural Fair being held at the Warren Farm on Sept. 12. The fair has its’ own website:  http://agfair.wordpress.com 

 

 

Posted 8/2/2009 6:49pm by Eleanor Kane.

New farmstand hours for the coming week are:  Monday closed, Tuesday 8-6, Wednesday and Thursday 9-6, Friday 9-4 and Saturday 9-1pm and Sunday 9-1pm.  This Saturday we are closing early to attend a wedding and usually we would stay open until 4pm. If we have lots of corn by next Sunday we may stay open beyond the 1pm closing time. More will be revealed!

Randy will have plenty of fresh picked strawberries and I will have beautiful heads of green lettuce and a frilly red lettuce. Also Swiss chard, onions, cukes, tomatoes, summer squash and Zucchini. Sweet corn could be starting by next weekend, we are not sure.

We will still have raspberries for picking. It is beyond peak picking, however you will still find lots of tasty berries.

 

The following excerpt is my reply to an email from some organization encouraging purchasing only organic food:

I think consuming local food from small local farms is much more important than eating only organic food. Organic food does not mean safe, it just means a type of growing standards. I will  not use the organic chemical pesticides or fungicides for various reasons that I will list for you if you desire.  Encouraging eating only organic is driving farming out of this country because the unknowing public is fed false information that organic is the only safe food to eat. Just look at the list of most toxic//sprayed food that magazines such as Vegetarian Times uses and you will see all food that is from the large corporate farm, not small farms. This results in many people not purchasing from local farms that are not certified organic and results in farms eventually going out of business. Those farms that go out of business end up as strip malls or housing developments, not new farms. This is the worst case scenario for our countryside. Our nation's security rests with our ability to sustain itself. If China stopped sending food to the USA at this point we would have food shortages. Not huge food shortages but food shortages that several generations haven't experienced.  Encouraging organic only is aiding and abetting our reliance on China and other countries to feed us.   Please push purchasing local and from small farms if they use safe, sustainable practices. Most small farms do. If they happen to be organic then great.  These growing practices are unlike the methods used by the overly large corporate farms that generally don't use all the sustainable practices any farmer that has respect for the land and nature uses. Expand awareness about not supporting the large corporate farm and keep America safe.

Posted 8/1/2009 8:47pm by Eleanor Kane.

 

The raspberries are past the midway point and we are now picking on all varieties.  PYO raspberries start at $3 per pint. It takes more work to fill your baskets at this point, however by next Tuesday the picking should be pretty good on the mid season varieties as we will be closed this Monday.

PYO green beans are $2 per pound. There are a few yellow beans also.

Randy has been picking the day neutral strawberries every day and so far we have had just enough to last the day, however he is not sure about the supply for tomorrow, Sunday. Call and check at 868.2001.  They are $3 per pint.

We have tomatoes, 2 varieties from our patch at this time. Also cucumbers, swiss chard, spinach,   onions, Cut your own flowers and herbs.  We still have 3 colors of the annual lisianthus in fiber paks for sale and they are really budding up and ready to bloom. Remember to cut them back after the first round of buds have opened as they will send up another stem and new buds. They can take the first few fall frosts but not a hard freeze. We sold all of our first planting of carrots and have more in the ground.

Our sweet corn is growing and perhaps we will have some by next weekend.  This year all our plantings came up and although late it looks good.

Any questions, call the farm phone at 868.2001

Food Fact: 25% of the food sold as organic in this country comes from China. Eurtope gets 60% of their organic food from China.  Since China has not allowed anyone to inspect their organic growing practices I'm curious why they are able to market the food as organic.  In reality it should not be sold as organic. If a farmer in this country refused to have their farm inspected periodically they would not be allowed to be certified organic. So, how is China able to market their food as certified organic?  Maybe they are following all the organic guidelines and maybe they are not. What do you think? Why don't we boycottfood from China in support of food from the USA?

Please you body and support your country, eat local!

Posted 7/29/2009 9:13pm by Eleanor Kane.

Hours this week are 8am-6pm Monday thru Thursday,  Friday and Saturday 8am - 4 pm and Sunday 8am - 1pm.  Any morning that arrives with heavy rain will find us opening after it stops. If rain begins sometime during the day and the radar shows it to continue into the night, we will close down for the day.   Call if you are not sure @ 868.2001

The raspberries have good to very good picking. We are beyond mid season now and still picking on the early varieties.  The mid season varieties have come on fully.  PYO raspberries start at $3 per pint.

PYO green beans are $2 per pound. There are a few yellow beans also, however they didn't germinate as well.

The day neutral strawberries have come back on and Randy  is picking every morning. Sometimes a very hard rain will damage the ripe berries resulting in fewer for the farmstand. The last few days we haven't run out and have had fresh picked strawberries all day on the farmstand.  They are $3 per pint.

We have tomatoes, 2 varieties from our patch at this time. Also cucumbers, swiss chard, spinach,   onions, Cut your own flowers and herbs.  We still have 3 colors of the annual lisianthus in fiber paks for sale and they are really budding up and ready to bloom. Remember to cut them back after the first round of buds have opened as they will send up another stem and new buds. They can take the first few fall frosts but not a hard freeze. We sold all of our first planting of carrots and have more in the ground.

Our sweet corn is growing and perhaps we will have some in another week or so. This year all our plantings came up and although late it looks good.

Any questions, call the farm phone at 868.2001

Please you body and support your country, eat local!

Food Fact: 25% of the food sold as organic in this country comes from China. China has not allowed anyone to inspect their organic growing practices. In reality it should not be sold as organic. If a farmer in this country refused to have their farm inspected periodically they would not be allowed to be certified organic. So, how is China able to market their food as certified organic?

Posted 7/27/2009 9:12am by Eleanor Kane.

Hours this week are 8am-6pm Monday thru Thursday,  Friday and Saturday 8am - 4 pm and Sunday 8am - 1pm.

The raspberries have very good to excellent picking. We are still picking the early varieties and the mid season varieties have many berries also. PYO raspberries start at $3 per pint.

PYO green beans are $2 per pound. There are a few yellow beans also, however they didn't germinate as well.

The day neutral strawberries have come back on and Randy  stocked the farmstand with them this morning. They are $3 per pint.

We have tomatoes, 2 varieties from our patch at this time. Also cucumbers, swiss chard, kale, spinach, carrots and onions, Cut your own flowers and herbs.  We still have 3 colors of lisianthus in fiber paks for sale and they are really budding up and ready to bloom. Remember to cut them back after the first round of buds have opened as they will send up another stem and new buds. They can take the first few fall frosts but not a hard freeze.

Our sweet corn is growing and perhaps we will have some in another 10 days to 2 weeks. This year all our plantings came up and although late it looks good.

Any questions, call the farm phone at 868.2001

 

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