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Posted 8/26/2014 5:29pm by Eleanor Kane.

Hi Folks,

First of all, we'll be open this week:

Wednesday 10am-6pm

Thursday 12pm-4pm

Saturday 10am-6pm

When we first started looking at farms to buy, beyond getting to drive around so much of New England and exploring all these great small towns, old houses, and rolling fields, we ended up taking in a lot of history about each property.  Sure, the most immediate facts we learned were about the sellers and the most recent crops grown on each farm, the condition of the barn, the house, the outbuildings and so on.  But as we walked around field after field, on farm after farm, and looked at stonewalls running through woods, covered in lichen and overgrown by forest, the presence of past generations of farmers seemed to be everywhere. There used to be an old well over there, we would learn at one property, or at another a realtor would point out where the apple orchard had been, now choked by weeds. Some fields were perfectly maintained, especially those around the houses and we could stand there in the barnyard of a farm that had been in operation for two hundred years and imagine the field being mowed season after season by cows, sheep, horse drawn mowers, the very first incarnations of tractors, and more modern John Deeres, bright and shiny green.  

Of course, eventually we found this farm, which is now our farm, and what were snippets of history gleaned at various properties were set aside so that we could learn the history of this land. We have all sorts of things here: the graveyard from the original family who farmed here in the 1700s, all the way up to the board in the kitchen where the Warren family marked the heights of their children.  We live with the history of this property everyday, whether it’s eating peaches from a tree planted years ago or shutting up the chickens in the barn that another farmer built.  

We’ve changed things here and there: the new pasture out back, or the second hoop house we’re installing this coming weekend (really puts the ‘labor’ in labor day, as you can imagine).  But even then, the work that we do here is informed by the work that has been done here for so many years and generations and even centuries.  Celebrating the return of our tractor, I went out to mow weeds that were overgrowing some of our fields, only to have to avoid rocks that I’m sure the Warrens knew like the back of their hands.  To me, I was mowing an area I had no real knowledge of, so each grind and clank (and resulting dust cloud of mowed rock) of the brush hog was a reminder that it will take me a while to learn my way around.  

I got back that afternoon, intending to commiserate with Theo about the lengthy process we had when it comes to learning our own farm, only to find that he had found his own piece of history. His afternoon project of cleaning up the room between the house and the farm store had turned into pulling down a piece of insulation that was beyond repair.  He said he had no idea what hit him: one minute he was tearing out the fiberglass and the next he was coughing and nearly choking.  While it would have seemed that I had the more ostensibly dangerous job of being on a tractor on unfamiliar fields, he described only being able to return to work after rinsing off his face and finding a dusk mask.  The cause of his distress?  It seemed that a family of mice had left their own mark on the farm in the form of a stash of dried hot peppers.  They were long gone, leaving behind a potent blend of… poblanos? Serranos? Habaneros?  We’ll have to ask the Warrens what they grew over the last few years to find out the exact culprit, but it seems that no matter what the variety was, the mice certainly enjoyed them.  

So as you can imagine, this news is two fold. One, we have hot peppers for sale in the store this week… and don’t worry, they’re harvested fresh from the fields after soaking up this late August heat.  Whatever ones you all don’t buy we’ll dry for ourselves for the winter, and probably keep a tally of how many we’ve used and how many we have left so that Theo’s never accosted by thieving, spice loving mice in the same way again.  

Second, I may some day learn where all the rocks are so that I’m not driving over them with the mower, but those will be the same rocks the Warrens steered around all those years, and the farmers before them, and the farmers before them. While we can change things around as much as we want, new shelves put up here, new pasture over there, we’re still working under the weight of history.  

This Week's Vegetables

  • Tomatoes 
  • Cherry Tomatoes
  • Hot peppers - a couple different varities including poblano, pimentos, and hungarian hot wax
  • Onions
  • Chard
  • Green Beans
  • Wax Beans
  • Green Peppers
  • Lettuce
  • Kale
  • Swiss Chard
  • Cabbage 

Other Available Products

  • Grassfed, Pasture Raised Pork, Chicken, Goat, and Beef
  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH

 

Posted 8/19/2014 5:20pm by Eleanor Kane.

Can you tell that most of my job on the farm is the vegetables (and the newsletter!) since that’s what I write about every week?  The other day Theo campaigned for more mentions of our animals and I had to admit that in the flurry of weeding, mowing, planting, harvesting, and selling vegetables, the livestock we share the farm with have the right to feel a bit neglected in the weekly updates.  

Raising animals was the main reason Theo and I started farming, and until we bought this farm we only sold meat and eggs – you can imagine that shifting from selling pork chops to Christmas trees was a bit of a 180 last year!  That, combined with growing a mixed crop of vegetables and managing the raspberries and peaches means that the sheep, goats, chickens, turkeys, and pigs got mixed into the fold of what we do each day.  For as much as any of you come here to get veggies, or in a couple months for a wreath or tree, you may happen to see a chicken scratching in the dirt, or you might here a ‘baa’ or two from the barn.  The front of the farm, where you all park and where Russell and Jeb run up to greet you, is a poor example of all the animal life happening here: we have chicks in the brooder, laying hens who live in the back of the barn at night and spend their days wandering the rest of the farm, our sow and boar who have taken over a couple acres in the woods beyond our potato patch, and a gang of piglets (who are not so piglet-y anymore) who have a huge fenced off area of pasture and woods to romp around in all day… when they’re not snoozing in the sun. Our sheep and goats live out on pasture… or they will when we resolve the issue of having moved to a farm with very limited pasture, plus the fact that they all have hoof rot. Hoof rot is exactly what it sounds like, just as icky and gross as can be imagined, but of all the summers for them to have it, this isn’t a bad one: all that wood ash we’re spreading is raising the pH of our new field which will help the grass to grow and in the next year or so, what was woods will turn into pasture.  In the meantime, since they (I’m looking at you, goats) like to snack on Christmas trees, we only have field edges and patches of grass here and there to graze the herd on, so they’ve spent a couple weeks of the summer holed up in the barn.  It’s less than ideal and we feel pretty bad about it, since we never wanted to get into raising animals only to coop them up.  At the same time, it’s important to treat their feet, and to graze the new pasture only when it’s ready, so that the grass isn’t exhausted by being eaten but instead invigorated to re-grow.  

I’m sure I’ll write more about the ins and outs of raising all these critters since it’s a huge part of our day, and they’re an important part of the farm in the way they add fertility to our soils and recycle all our left over vegetables into eggs and meat.  For now, I’ll just say that the end of August is a bittersweet time for us when we think about the livestock that were born here last winter. Our lambs, kids, and pigs will be heading off to the slaughterhouse soon, even as we plan the breeding schedules and births for 2015.  It’s all part of the yearly cycle of the farm and as much as the farm will feel a bit empty without them, it means that we’ll have local, humanely raised, grass fed meat for all of you this fall.  

In preparation for that, Theo wanted me to let all of you know that it’s time to do our big clean out of our freezers. We have lots and lots of bones which are great either for dogs or for making broth, along with offal, fatback and leaf lard for rendering your own lard, and quite a few pork shoulders which would make great BBQ pork or big roasts once the weather turns cooler.  

Let us know if you want any of the above, and we’re marking down bones and offal by 50% until they're gone.  Hope you swing by to pick some up for yourselves or your dogs, since try as they might, Jeb and Russell can’t actually finish all that we have!

 

This Week's Vegetables

  • Tomatoes
  • Cherry Tomatoes
  • Hungarian Hot Wax Peppers
  • Onions
  • Chard
  • Green Beans
  • Wax Beans
  • Green Peppers
  • Kale
  • Swiss Chard
  • Cabbage 

Other Available Products

  • Grassfed, Pasture Raised Pork, Chicken, Goat, and Beef
  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH
Posted 8/12/2014 3:37pm by Eleanor Kane.

 

First things, first, for this week only we will be closing at 5pm on Saturday.  So our hours this week are: Wednesday 10-6 and Saturday 10-5.

I was out checking on the corn today (which is unfortunately not ready yet) and happened to look down.  My first thought was that there was some sort of strange orange thing in our field and my second thought was hey!  Look, a pumpkin!  

They’re not ready to harvest yet since they’re still forming their thick rind and the vines are still pumping sugars and nutrients into them, but it is a harbinger of the fact that in the middle of August, things start to feel a bit different.  We’re still on the cusp of some crops, such as that our peaches are only slowly starting to ripen and we’re still waiting for watermelons and some of the funkier heirloom tomatoes, but in a lot of ways the season is turning towards fall.   If that seems rushed on such a beautiful August day, it definitely is.  But at the same time, while we’re only halfway through our harvest for the year, the bulk of the work is done.  Sure, we still have our monstrous weeds to contend with (don’t worry, the parts for our tractor are ordered and will be here soon!) and hundreds of pounds of fruit and vegetables to bring in out of our fields before the snow flies, but the summer scramble of work has died down.  

Where does that leave us?  Eating the first ripe peaches from the trees, eating as many tomatoes as we can stomach, eating cabbage, eating broccoli, eating beans, eating peppers… sensing a theme?  These are the weeks I think back to when it’s winter and we’re shopping at the grocery store for fresh produce.  Harvesting in August can seem like a chore, with full bins of vegetables after full bins of vegetables coming to the washup station to be cleaned, repacked, and put out in the store, but it’s also a blessing that begins now with the height of all this summer produce, and one that continues through September and October as we reap all the hard work that we started in February when we seeded those first onions.  It’s part of the rhythm of the year, a rhythm that changes when you’re a farmer and are thinking about watermelons when the snow’s on the ground, and pumpkins when it’s a perfect August beach day.  We might constantly have our heads a few months ahead of where our bodies are, but there’s something rather enjoyable about having a handful of cherry tomatoes I picked off the vine while I watch our fall crops continue to grow.

 

This Week's Vegetables

  • Tomatoes
  • Cherry Tomatoes
  • Hungarian Hot Wax Peppers
  • Onions
  • Chard
  • Green Beans
  • Wax Beans
  • Zucchini
  • Summer Squash
  • Slicing Cucumbers
  • Pickling Cucumbers
  • Green Peppers
  • Kale
  • Collards
  • Cabbage 

Other Available Products

  • Grassfed, Pasture Raised Pork, Chicken, Goat, and Beef
  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH

 

 

Posted 8/5/2014 7:08pm by Eleanor Kane.

It is just one of those weeks.  I came home from our Tuesday farmers market, which got rained out halfway through, to find the tractor half taken apart – literally, half of it.  One of the big back wheels placed to the side of the shop and tractor guts everywhere, plus one frustrated Theo with tools everywhere and no end to the repairs in sight.  The differential lock is broken, which might mean something to some of you and to me means simply that the tractor isn’t going anywhere anytime soon.  That means that our weedy fields are going to stay weedy for another long while, our cover crop seed will be sitting tight since we can’t plant it, the wood ash pile will continue to solidify into a pile of cement from the rain, and the overgrown field edges will continue to grow out of control, unmowed.
 
While there’s few things more discouraging than seeing in the inside of your tractor, the good thing about having a diversified farm is that as soon as something gets really bad, something else is doing just great.  Ellen and Rena, one of our volunteers, harvested nearly two bins of Adirondack Red potatoes which look awesome and are ready to go home with you all.  In fun animaly news, our pigs redecorated their enclosure by moving their house.  I have to assume they just weren’t feeling the feng shui of where their shelter was and there’s nothing like a full grown sow and a full grown boar putting their minds to some renovations – they moved it a good twenty feet farther back into the woods which is a pretty amusing thing to go out and find while doing chores.  Three rabbits got out and while that’s ostensibly on the list of things not going so well, they hang around the barnyard all day.  It me feel like I’m living in a chapter of Watership Down and it increases the cuteness quotient of the farm by a measure of six twitching ears, six thumping feet, three fluffy tails, and three wiggling noses.
 
On the list of the types of tradeoffs that come with the job, the cooler summer means we’re escaping the existentially trying heat of early August but we’re dealing with an incredible amount of rain and storms so frequent that we have May-like puddles in the fields.  The fall carrots are looking great… and the summer carrots are still not so interested in growing.  We have tons of green peppers, which are exactly that: green with apparently no intention of turning red.  The good news is that they’re delicious no matter what the color and the better news is that we’ve been having some summer feasts of hot sausage tossed with peppers, onions, and tomatoes, served over roasted potatoes.  Nothing like a meal with every ingredient from the farm and followed by some well deserved ice cream since the tractor still isn’t fixed and sometimes you just have to put down your wrench, pick up a spoon, and try again in the morning.

 

This Week's Vegetables

Hungarian Hot Wax Peppers
Onions
Chard
Green Beans
Wax Beans
Zucchini
Summer Squash
Slicing Cucumbers
Pickling Cucumbers
Green Peppers
Kale
Collards
Cabbage

 

Other Available Products

  • Grassfed, Pasture Raised Pork, Chicken, Goat, and Beef
  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH
Posted 7/29/2014 8:44pm by Eleanor Kane.

Recently, I was asked why I was drawn to farming and amid a myriad of answers, the one that rose to the forefront of my mind – no doubt being in the middle of our busiest season had something to do with it – was that farming is an industry where the harder you work, the greater the reward.  It’s an incredibly tangible career to be in: at the beginning of the day, the field is weedy and at the end of the day, it’s not.  At the beginning of the day, the crops are in the field, by the end of harvest, they’re washed and ready to go home with all of you.  The sheep were in that field, now they’re in this one, the chicken coop was dirty, now it’s clean.  There’s something very appealing about seeing the fruits of your labor a couple hours later and there’s something equally appealing about knowing that if you just complete a task, you’ll reap the dividends, whether it’s a greater onion yield from weeding more, or bigger heads of broccoli by getting the irrigation set up during a dry week.
 
It’s funny, though, that this was my first answer because as much as all of that is true, there’s the other side of the coin: Theo went out to spread wood ash on our new pasture and the belt on the spreader broke.  Luck of the draw, as it were, and now there’s a spreader and an enormous pile of wood ash sitting out back waiting for a new belt to be delivered, whenever that might be.  Last week, we moved our ram and buck (otherwise known as Ramchop and Nelson, respectively) to a fresh paddock and they decided they’d rather be in the barn, and that’s exactly where they were when we woke up.  Short of a concrete bunker for our livestock (exactly the type of farming we're steering clear of!), or a Tractor Supply setting up shop right here on the farm, those things are out of our hands and we’re forced to roll with them when they happen, no matter if that was a perfect day to spread the wood ash, or that we had other work to do besides trying to convince two obstinate male animals to stay put.
 
So there’s working hard and there’s reacting to things as they come, and then there’s the perfect irony of when those things intersect.  This week, the cherry tomatoes were the embodiment of the sheer frustration of hard work amounting to very little.  We did everything right and things were going great: the seedlings looked fabulous for weeks in the greenhouse, despite a chilly spring that threatened them with low nightly temperatures and had us keeping the heat mats on far longer than we expected.  Once in the field, we irrigated when it was too dry, weeded when they were getting crowded, pruned them when they branched out, and staked them when they threatened to flop over.  And then right as the tomatoes for the first big harvest were turning from green to orange to red, we got all this rain.  The silver lining is that we took a bit of a rest while it poured (and that Ramchop and Nelson were sufficiently self congratulatory for having decided to move into the barn) and the bad news is that we have tons and tons of cherry tomatoes with enormous splits in them due to so much sudden water.  We could have tried to harvest all of them ahead of the rain, but we don’t think that anyone’s keen on buying local, fresh produce that isn’t all that fresh after sitting inside for a couple days.

 
We’ll salvage what we can and look forward to the next wave of them ripening.  We’ll also be waiting for that belt to arrive and have our eye out for any animals who are thinking about relocating even as we do the rest of the work the end of July dictates: harvesting potatoes and onions, curing garlic, and getting the cabbages, broccoli, carrots, beets, beans, and sale-able tomatoes out of the field and ready for all of you on Wednesday and Saturday.

This Week's Vegetables

Hungarian Hot Wax Peppers
Onions
Chard
Green Beans
Wax Beans
Zucchini
Summer Squash
Slicing Cucumbers
Pickling Cucumbers
Green Peppers
Kale
Collards
Cabbage

 

Other Available Products

  • Grassfed, Pasture Raised Pork, Chicken, Goat, and Beef
  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH
Posted 7/22/2014 7:22pm by Eleanor Kane.
We're going to stretch this raspberry season for as long as we can!  We'll be open again this week for pick your own raspberries on Wednesday, July 23rd and Saturday, July 26th from 10am to 6pm for pick your own raspberries!  We're guessing that by Saturday only the last few berries will be out there, so plan to come on Wednesday if you want to pick in bulk.

Please come by the farm store before picking.  We’ll give you containers to pick into and explain the best rows to pick from.  If you bring your own containers, we’ll weigh them before you pick.

Price:  5.49/ lb (which works out to about $3.50/ pint) 

Things To Know  

  • Long Pants: We know it’s summer and there’s nothing like running around in shorts and skirts, but we don’t mow our grass as short as some farms do, so come prepared for taller grass as well as potentially some ticks.  
  • Close Toed Shoes: We’re a working farm and the terrain can be slightly rough. We strongly recommend avoiding flip-flops and sandals  
  • No Dogs: Dogs will not be allowed in the berry patch (except for Russell who might follow you out there – sorry he barks so much!  He’s very friendly!)  
  • Weeds: We have not had a chance to weed the raspberries this summer.  We’re still grappling with this being our first season on the farm, so please pardon our appearance as we continue to get our feet under us!

Other Available Products
The farm store will be open as normal, with a selection of our vegetables, as well as other products we carry:

  • Grassfed, Pasture Raised Pork, Chicken, Goat, and Beef
  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH
Posted 7/22/2014 7:18pm by Eleanor Kane.

I find that even with the variety of food that we produce here on the farm, Theo and I constantly find ourselves in a rut of preparing it the same way.  Kale?  Wilted in a pan with onions and a fried egg on top.  Summer squash and zucchini?  Chopped up and mixed with onions and sausage or if we’re feeling particularly adventurous, we throw it on the grill.  Snap peas?  Raw, straight out of the harvest bucket.  Beets?  Boiled, then peeled, then tossed with a little bit of butter and salt.  Living in what basically amounts to a grocery store doesn’t engender the culinary adventures you might think it should and this time of year I look at our dinner which, more often than not, is a recipe we fondly call ‘stuff in a pan’ and get a bit tired of it.  It is, you guessed it, left over veggies from the farmers market or farm store that we roughly chop, sauté with some olive oil and if we have extra energy after a long day in the fields, grate cheese over. 
 
That means that every once in a while I look at the food we have and think that we should do something different with it that we’ve never done before.  This week, that different thing was grabbing a couple of bunches of swiss chard and the tops of a bunch of onions we had and making swiss chard pancakes.  To say I was skeptical would be an understatement, since I served them to Ellen and Theo with the disclaimer of ‘these might be really bad.’
 
Luckily, they weren’t bad, they were delicious, especially with some greek yogurt on top (we were out of sour cream, which would have worked just as well).  I might have also added some hot sauce, especially if you like things on the spicier side (can’t wait for those hot peppers to be ready!).  They make a great side dish and I’m considering making them next time we have friends over for dinner, since they’d be excellent with a pork chop or some chicken.
 
2/3 cup milk
¾ cup flour
1 Tbsp baking powder
1 egg
1 egg white
½ tsp salt
1 tsp ground cumin
2 bunches swiss chard
1 bunch scallions (or the tops of one of our bunches of onions)
olive oil for the pan
 
Remove swiss chard ribs (you can do this quickly by holding the stem in one hand and stripping down the leaf with the other).  Chop into 1 inch pieces.  Wilt in a man and drain in a colander – it’s easiest to do this with the back of a wooden spoon since the chard will be hot.
 
Put the flour, baking powder, whole egg, melted butter, salt, cumin and milk in a large mixing bowl and whisk until smooth. Add the green onions and chard and mix with a fork. Whisk the egg white to soft peaks and gently fold it into the batter.
Pour a small amount of olive oil into a heavy frying pan and place on medium-high heat. For each pancake, ladle a spoonful of batter into the pan. You should get smallish pancakes, about 4 inches in diameter and 1/2 inch thick. Cook for about 2 minutes on each side, or until you get a good golden-green color. 

This Week's Vegetables

  • Yellow Onions
  • Red Onions
  • Swiss Chard
  • Kale
  • Summer Squash
  • Zucchini
  • Slicing Cucumbers
  • Pickling Cucumbers
  • String Beans
  • Collards
  • Raspberries - PYO

 

Other Available Products

  • Grassfed, Pasture Raised Pork, Chicken, Goat, and Beef
  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH
Posted 7/15/2014 11:25am by Eleanor Kane.

We had such a good time with everyone on Sunday - thanks to those who stopped by!  We'll be open again this week for pick your own raspberries on Wednesday, July 16th and Saturday, July 19th from 10am to 6pm for pick your own raspberries!  Hopefully the weather tomorrow won't be too bad!

Please come by the farm store before picking.  We’ll give you containers to pick into and explain the best rows to pick from.  If you bring your own containers, we’ll weigh them before you pick.

Price:  5.49/ lb (which works out to about $3.50/ pint) 

Things To Know  

  • Long Pants: We know it’s summer and there’s nothing like running around in shorts and skirts, but we don’t mow our grass as short as some farms do, so come prepared for taller grass as well as potentially some ticks.  
  • Close Toed Shoes: We’re a working farm and the terrain can be slightly rough. We strongly recommend avoiding flip-flops and sandals  
  • No Dogs: Dogs will not be allowed in the berry patch (except for Russell who might follow you out there – sorry he barks so much!  He’s very friendly!)  
  • Weeds: We have not had a chance to weed the raspberries this summer.  We’re still grappling with this being our first season on the farm, so please pardon our appearance as we continue to get our feet under us!

Other Available Products
The farm store will be open as normal, with a selection of our vegetables, as well as other products we carry:

  • Grassfed, Pasture Raised Pork, Chicken, Goat, and Beef
  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH
Posted 7/15/2014 11:21am by Eleanor Kane.

There’s nothing more fun – and terrifying – than sitting with seed catalogues in the middle of winter.  Fun because I love picking out my favorites: Boothbay Blonde cucumbers, and the red torpedo onions that we had last week, and Jimmy Nardelo peppers which will be ripening up soon.  Terrifying because I always try something new each year and just cross my fingers that it works out. The Skyphos lettuce, which is the red one we’ve had, turned out to be a good choice, and it seems like the heirloom tomatoes I chose are setting fruit well and looking healthy – can’t wait for them to be ready!  I figured that a new variety of cabbage was in order, too, and I picked the Gonzales mini cabbage to try out this year.  

They weren’t kidding when they said ‘mini.’ It’s ready when the heads are 4-6 inches across and I seriously considered taking a tape measure into the field to check the size, since they looked way too small (instead of a tape measure, I did what any resourceful, modern farmer would do and used my iPhone as a reference).  Even them being ostensibly the right size, it seemed like they could hardly be enough food, so I harvested one for dinner to try it out (and I did what any resourceful, professional farmer would do and called my mom for a recipe). It turns out that this tiny cabbage that fit in my hand served four adults for dinner with tons of leftovers and it was delicious.  What was better was that the recipe needs only a handful of ingredients, you don’t need to turn on the stove, and we happen to sell some delicious red onions!  

Cabbage Salad:

  • 3 cups shredded or sliced green cabbage
  • 1⁄2 c. coarsely grated sharp cheddar cheese (sharper is better)
  • 1⁄4 c. minced red onion  

Dressing:

  • Dijon mustard
  • Olive oil
  • Red wine vinegar
  • Salt and pepper  

Combine the cabbage, cheese and onion in a large bowl. Make a dressing by whisking about 1 tsp. Dijon mustard with 1 tsp. red wine vinegar and salt and pepper to taste in a small bowl. Slowly drizzle in about 2-4 tblsp olive oil while continuing to whisk to keep the mixture emulsified. Amounts of mustard, vinegar and oil can vary based on preference.   Combine the salad ingredients with the dressing. This salad is best made a few hours ahead and left at room temperature so flavors can develop.                

CSA Members

A couple house of keeping notes. First, we’re still figuring out our policies, what works and what doesn’t, and one thing we hadn’t really thought of was a deadline each week to switch your pick up day and/or share type.  Moving forward, please let us know by Tuesday at noon if you would like to change your pick up day or switch your market/boxed share.  We’ll give you a free pass for this week, if you need to get in touch with us later today.  But in general, knowing on the early side helps us out in terms of figuring how much of everything to harvest… especially as we move forward into exciting items like the very first tomatoes!  (There was a single ripe one in the field yesterday, so I’m hoping that maybe by next week we’ll have cherry tomatoes?  The week after?)  

And speaking of tomatoes (and watermelon and carrots and beets and broccoli and peaches), since we reserve the first harvest of each of these fruits and veggies for you all, I’m going to switch everyone to a different newsletter, so that I’m not advertising what end up being CSA only treats to the entire mailing list.  After this week, you’ll start receiving the weekly email from Brasen Hill Farm (which is what we’re switching our name to, as this is the last year of using the Warren Farm name) and it’ll look a little different.  

Still on the topic of tomatoes (and all those other exciting veggies!), it’s pretty impossible to convince the plants to ripen everything they’ve got on Wednesday and Saturday mornings – not that we don’t try! That means, as the first of all this trickles in, we sometimes won’t have enough for each CSA member every day. We keep track to make sure that each share type is treated equally, so we’ll either give it to all the market members, or all the boxed share members, or all the full share members, and so on.  Just know, that if you see someone getting tomatoes and it’s not in your share that week, it’s coming!  I keep track of all this throughout the season, from the time we had asparagus (ages ago, right?), and onwards through the summer fruits, tomatoes, corn, peppers, and pumpkins, so that by the end of the season, it all ends up being completely even.  

Also (final thing, I swear!), for boxed share members – we don’t allow substitutions, as you know.  However, we are growing two types of cucumbers, the whiteish/yellow ones that are a fresh, slicing one and the darker green, pickling ones. If you have a specific desire to pickle, we are happy to put those in your share (subject to availability), versus the ones that are better for salads.    

This Week’s Vegetables  

Items in italics are limited  

  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Raspberries
  • Red Onions
  • Yellow
  • Onions
  • Chard
  • Lettuce
  • Kale
  • Arugula
  • Snap Peas
  • Summer Squash
  • Zucchini
  • Slicing Cucumbers
  • Pickling Cucumbers
  • Bok Choi
  • New Potatoes



Other Available Products

  • Grassfed, Pasture Raised Pork, Chicken, Goat, and Beef
  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH
Posted 7/12/2014 12:39pm by Eleanor Kane.

We will be open Sunday, July 13th from 1pm to 5pm with pick your own raspberries!  The crop looks great this year and we’re excited to share it with you all.

Please come by the farm store before picking.  We’ll give you containers to pick into and explain the best rows to pick from.  If you bring your own containers, we’ll weigh them before you pick.

We will likely be open again for pick your own in the next week, so if you can't make it tomorrow, keep an eye out for our weekly newsletter for updates!

 

Price:  5.49/ lb (which works out to about $3.50/ pint) 

 

Things To Know  

  • Long Pants: We know it’s summer and there’s nothing like running around in shorts and skirts, but we don’t mow our grass as short as some farms do, so come prepared for taller grass as well as potentially some ticks.  
  • Close Toed Shoes: We’re a working farm and the terrain can be slightly rough. We strongly recommend avoiding flip-flops and sandals  
  • No Dogs: Dogs will not be allowed in the berry patch (except for Russell who might follow you out there – sorry he barks so much!  He’s very friendly!)  
  • Weeds: We have not had a chance to weed the raspberries this summer.  We’re still grappling with this being our first season on the farm, so please pardon our appearance as we continue to get our feet under us!

Other Available Products
The farm store will be open as normal, with a selection of our vegetables, as well as other products we carry:

  • Grassfed, Pasture Raised Pork, Chicken, Goat, and Beef
  • Fresh Eggs: $5 /doz
  • Homemade soap
  • Handmade, local pottery, including mugs, bowls, jars, and plates
  • Local maple syrup from right here in Barrington, NH
Methods of payment

We accept credit cards, local checks, and cash.